Baptist Children's Homes' Franklin Road subdivision faces decision by Brentwood City Commission on Jan. 11

A site map showing proposed subdivisions on the campus of the Tennessee Baptist Children's Homes at 1310 Franklin Road in Brentwood. The nonprofit child care organization wants to use the proceeds of selling the land for redevelopment to revamp its residences for children. (Courtesy-Ragan Smith)
A site map showing proposed subdivisions on the campus of the Tennessee Baptist Children's Homes at 1310 Franklin Road in Brentwood. The nonprofit child care organization wants to use the proceeds of selling the land for redevelopment to revamp its residences for children. (Courtesy-Ragan Smith)

A site map showing proposed subdivisions on the campus of the Tennessee Baptist Children's Homes at 1310 Franklin Road in Brentwood. The nonprofit child care organization wants to use the proceeds of selling the land for redevelopment to revamp its residences for children. (Courtesy-Ragan Smith)

At its Jan. 11 meeting, the Brentwood City Commission will reconsider a request to rezone more than 30 acres of Tennessee Baptist Children's Homes property so the nonprofit child care facility can sell it to be turned into single-family homes.

The organization plans to use the proceeds of the sale to fund rebuilding and renovating housing and facilities for children in need on the remaining campus at 1310 Franklin Road in Brentwood. The meeting will be at 7 p.m. at Brentwood City Hall, 5211 Maryland Way, Brentwood. The meeting can be watched here.

At a public hearing last month, Melanie Dunn, a Brentwood resident and board member of the home, said the redevelopment of the land will finance the overdue modernization of the residences.

“The new homes will be designed to be functional, comfortable and energy-, technology- and cost-efficient and to provide the best environment for children to thrive,” she said. “I think it would help us for the next 100 years to take care of the children of Brentwood.”

The City Commission voted in early November to reject an initial request to rezone the land, which led to TBCH resubmitting the proposal reducing the initial number of lots requested to 25.

Under the proposal put forward, 31.7 acres between Franklin and Wikle Road belonging to the organization would be recategorized from service institution-educational with special restrictions to open space residential. If approved, the new subdivision would be called Eastman’s Preserve in honor of Georgia Eastman, who established TBCH as a home for orphans in 1891.

Residents of the surrounding area said last month they supported the home’s mission and plans to refurbish; however, drainage impacts on the adjacent Kings Crossing subdivision and traffic in the surrounding neighborhood have yet to be addressed.
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