Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen gets ball rolling on plans for Southbrooke development

Franklin alderpersons heard a presentation July 9 on the initial plans for a 318-acre development on Lewisburg Pike.

The working plan for the Southbrooke subdivision, located near the Berry Farms development, currently calls for some of the lots to be smaller than the 45-foot minimum recommended by Envision Franklin, the city’s planning document, according to city staff.

The smallest lots in the plans for the development will be 34-foot lots for those units, according to the presentation. Those lots are internal to the property, or not visible from Lewisburg Pike, design consultant Greg Gamble said.

He compared the design characteristics of the planned development to Westhaven and Berry Farms.

“This isn’t the only time we’ve had development plans come through that have a smaller lot size than that minimum,” City Manager Eric Stuckey told the board. “If this is gonna be something you want us to explore, we’d like to do that in a more systematic way, incorporate it in Envision Franklin—it has ramifications for how we do other planning because that leads to greater density, which puts greater strain on infrastructure, specifically water and sewer and road impact.”

Gamble, speaking on behalf of the developer, said with the expected growth of the Berry Farms mixed-use development, which will lead to more jobs, nearby housing is sorely needed.

“We just have not had housing to keep up with the job growth that we have seen,” Gamble said.

Affordable housing

Gamble said the residences in the development would likely start at about $280,000 and range up to $1 million, based on the median income in Franklin.

“I think this is one of those unique situations where I’m seeing a diverse price point, and that’s something I have advocated for a while on this board,” Alderperson Pearl Bransford said. “I would not be opposed to this particular plan going forward with a mixture and a diverseness of it, and that’s one way we can get some of these families who are probably in that $80,000 a year household job to come and live in our community.”

According to its current plans, the development will pay $4.7 million in road impact fees and almost $7 million in educational impact fees, Gamble said.

The board passed a preliminary vote for the zoning and annexation plans on the consent agenda at the July 9 meeting. The public hearing for the development plan will take place Aug. 13, along with the final vote for the zoning, annexation and plan of services.


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