Williamson County active COVID-19 case count reaches 5-month low; officials urge continued mask wearing

See how COVID-19 has impacted Williamson County in recent weeks. (Community Impact staff)
See how COVID-19 has impacted Williamson County in recent weeks. (Community Impact staff)

See how COVID-19 has impacted Williamson County in recent weeks. (Community Impact staff)

The number of active coronavirus cases in Williamson County has dropped to 515 as of March 1, according to the Tennessee Department of Health.

This total is the lowest since Oct. 5, when the county reported 500 cases, according to TDH data. The county saw its highest number of reported active cases Jan. 10, with 2,611.

The county has seen a steady decline in cases in recent weeks, which prompted Williamson County Mayor Rogers Anderson to allow the area's mask mandate—which has been in effect for the last several months—to expire.

However, local officials are urging residents to continue to wear masks in public spaces even when they are not required to do so.

In a Feb. 27 statement, Franklin Mayor Ken Moore said residents should continue to wear masks and practice social distancing to help keep case numbers low.


"As mayor of Franklin, my first priority is to protect the wellbeing of our community, I respect County Mayor Anderson’s decision he made regarding the mask/face covering mandate," Moore said. "However I urge citizens of Franklin to continue to wear masks/face coverings in public and in any area where appropriate physical distancing cannot be maintained. As your Mayor and as a medical doctor for more than 50 years, I believe this is the best way to control the spread of COVID-19. While we are all encouraged by the progress we have made in the last few months, I urge all citizens to take safeguards seriously until more vaccines can be distributed."

The mask mandate expiration does not apply to local schools, and individual businesses are still allowed to require masks, according to the county.

Take a look at the recent decline in active cases below.
By Wendy Sturges
A Houston native and graduate of St. Edward's University in Austin, Wendy Sturges has worked as a community journalist covering local government, health care, business and development since 2011. She has worked with Community Impact since 2015 as a reporter and editor and moved to Tennessee in 2019.