Williamson County Health Department opens COVID-19 testing sites

The Williamson County Health Department announced April 6 the opening of COVID-19 assessment sites for county residents who meet pre-screening and pre-registration requirements. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
The Williamson County Health Department announced April 6 the opening of COVID-19 assessment sites for county residents who meet pre-screening and pre-registration requirements. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

The Williamson County Health Department announced April 6 the opening of COVID-19 assessment sites for county residents who meet pre-screening and pre-registration requirements. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

The Williamson County Health Department announced April 6 the opening of COVID-19 assessment sites for county residents who meet pre-screening and pre-registration requirements.


According to a release from the county health department, residents who are concerned they might have COVID-19-related symptoms can contact their local health department for consultation or drive-thru assessment and testing sites currently available in both Franklin and Fairview.

The Franklin clinic, located at 1324 W. Main St., Franklin, and the Fairview clinic, located at 2629 Fairview Blvd., Fairview, will be open for coronavirus testing from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday-Friday.


The health department’s release said most people with mild or no symptoms do not need assessment for COVID-19, while those in high-risk categories, including those who have had contact with individuals with confirmed cases; those with occupations that expose them to large numbers of confirmed cases; healthcare workers; immunocompromised individuals; critically ill patients; pregnant women and those with COVID-19 symptoms are prioritized for testing.

To reduce the spread of COVID-19, the WCHD is urging residents to continue following the guidelines promoted by the Centers for Disease Control, including:




  • Washing hands with soap and water, or alcohol-based hand sanitizer when soap is not available, for at least 20 seconds, especially after coughing and sneezing,

  • Not touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands,

  • Staying at home when sick,

  • Covering coughs and sneezes with an arm or tissue,

  • Clean and disinfect highly-touched surfaces regularly,

  • Practice social and physical distancing from others.


Residents in the state of Tennessee are also encouraged to keep at least six feet away from others, limit their time in public to essential needs only, avoid crowds, avoid non-essential travel and stay at home as much as possible to reduce their risk of being exposed or exposing others.

For ongoing information from the Tennessee Department of Health, visit www.tn.gov/health/cedep/ncov.html.


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