State of emergency declared for Franklin, Brentwood; restaurants to offer take-out only

Franklin Mayor Ken Moore declared a state of emergency to go into effect March 20 at midnight in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)
Franklin Mayor Ken Moore declared a state of emergency to go into effect March 20 at midnight in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

Franklin Mayor Ken Moore declared a state of emergency to go into effect March 20 at midnight in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

Franklin and Brentwood officials have declared a state of emergency in each city following the spread of coronavirus in the region.

Franklin Mayor Ken Moore said Franklin's emergency declaration will go into effect March 20 at midnight in response to the coronavirus pandemic, following Gov. Bill Lee’s declaration of the state of Tennessee going into a state of emergency last week. The city of Brentwood's declaration will go into effect March 21 at 6 p.m.


According to press releases from each city, restaurants and bars will be required to cease inside dining services, and gyms and fitness centers in the city are required to close indefinitely. Spas and salons, as well as other businesses, are required to limit activity to be compliant with Centers for Disease Control guidelines. Church services are advised to be held digitally as a result of the declaration, which is based on the authority granted to local government officials under state law.


“While this limits people from eating inside restaurants, there are a variety of ways residents can continue to support Brentwood restaurant businesses and employees. Please consider buying a gift card for dining later in the year, order take-out, or even drop off a meal to a neighbor," Brentwood Mayor Rhea Little said in statement.

Both mayors also advise those returning from spring break trips to self-isolate and physically distance themselves from other for 14 days, especially those who were in large crowds or who travelled on an airplane. These measures are intended to slow the spread of COVID-19 and protect vulnerable populations so as not to overwhelm local hospitals.

“While this is a difficult and uncertain time, the only way to stop the spread and save lives is to take strong action now,” Moore said. “Williamson County currently has the second highest number of cases in the state of Tennessee. The safety and health of our community are the city’s top priority and we appreciate everyone’s patience and understanding during this time.”


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