LIVE UPDATES: Keep up with coronavirus announcements in Williamson County

(Courtesy Adobe Stock)
(Courtesy Adobe Stock)

(Courtesy Adobe Stock)

While the novel coronavirus disease, also known as COVID-19, has been in the news since December, it has only been two weeks since the first case of coronavirus was confirmed in Tennessee. Take a look at the timeline below for updates on case numbers as well as how the spread has affected the region.

This story will be frequently updated with outbreak-related news and links to other in-depth coverage.

Updated 2:10 April 7

The number of cases of coronavirus across the state has risen to 4,138 according to the Tennessee Department of Health. That is 336 more cases that yesterday, which saw a lower number of new cases than in recent days. Yesterday TDH Commissioner Dr. Lisa Piercey said the country is expected to see a large number of hospitalizations this week as it has been approximately two weeks since the state saw case numbers beginning to spike. The state has had 408 total hospitalizations, 72 deaths and 466 recovered patients. More than 52,000 tests have been completed statewide.

Updated 2:05 p.m. April 6


Cases of coronavirus in the state now total 3,802, according to the Tennessee Department of Health. That number is 169 more cases than yesterday and includes 65 deaths and 356 recovered patients, according to the TDH. Davidson County continues to have the highest number of cases statewide, with more than 800 TDH-reported cases, however that number could be higher as Metro Nashville officials report more than 1,000 cases have been confirmed in the city. Williamson County has 260 cases.

Updated 2 p.m. April 5:

The Tennessee Department of Health announced April 5 the number of cases across the state has risen to 3,633. This includes 295 people who have recovered and 44 deaths. More than 45,000 tests have been conducted statewide, according to the TDH. TDH officials also announced there was an error in yesterday's reporting, which led to a higher number of recovered patients.

Updated 3:15 p.m. April 4:

Cases of coronavirus across the state have risen to 3,321, according to the latest data from the Tennessee Department of Health. Of that number, 416 people have recovered and 43 have died, according to the TDH.

Updated 2 p.m. April 3:

There are at least 3,067 confirmed cases of coronavirus in the state, according to new data from the Tennessee Department of Health. This includes 248 recovered patients and 37 deaths, both of which are up from yesterday. Davidson County continues to have the highest numbers in the state with at least 685 confirmed cases. More than 37,000 tests have been performed statewide.

Updated 2 p.m. April 2

Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee have risen to 2,845, more than 160 new cases since yesterday afternoon, according to the latest totals from the Tennessee Department of Health. The state has seen a rise in the number of reported deaths from yesterday, up 8 for a total of 38 deaths. However, the number of recovered patients has also risen, up 83 for a total of 220. Davidson County has the highest number of cases with between 600-800 cases, according to data from both the TDH and Metro Nashville. Williamson County has 199, 51 new cases since yesterday.

Updated 2:10 p.m. April 1

The state of Tennessee now has at least 2,683 confirmed cases of coronavirus, according to an April 1 update from the Tennessee Department of Health. That marks an increase of 444 new cases since yesterday, the highest increase to date. The day-over-day increases in new cases have been at their highest in the past three days, according to daily data from the TDH. To date, there have been 200 hospitalizations, 137 recoveries and 24 deaths. More than 32,000 cases have been conducted across the state, both from state and private labs.

Updated 2:05 p.m. March 31

Cases of coronavirus across the state have risen to at least 2,239, according to the Tennessee Department of Health.

This is an increase of 405 cases from yesterday, the largest daily increase yet, according to past data from the TDH.

More than 27,000 tests have been conducted statewide, and Tennessee has seen 23 deaths and 175 hospitalizations since the beginning of the outbreak, according to the TDH.

Updated 3:10 March 30:

Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee announced March 30 the state is now under a safer-at-home order to limit the spread of coronavirus in the region by mandating social distancing practices.

Lee said coronavirus has been confirmed in 77 of the state’s 95 counties and has caused 13 deaths statewide. While many cities have already implemented stay-at-home orders, Lee said he was concerned about the number of rural communities that are seeing growing cases numbers.

Executive Order 22 mandates that all non-essential businesses "that cannot possibly safely operate" close for at least a 14-day period. Lee cited business including barbershops, salons, recreational and entertainment outfits as examples of these types of businesses. State-deemed essential services include hospitals, doctor’s offices, restaurants that offer to-go service only and grocery stores.

Updated 2:10 p.m. March 30

Tennessee now has at least 1,834 total cases of coronavirus, according to the latest data from the Tennessee Department of Health. That number is increase of nearly 300 new cases since yesterday. This morning, officials with Metro Nashville announced that Davidson County now has 443 confirmed cases, including three deaths and 80 recovered cases. According to the TDH, Williamson County has 111 cases, up 10 since yesterday. More than 23,000 tests have been performed, according to the TDH.

Updated 2:20 p.m. March 29

Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee has risen to at least 1,537, according to the latest update from the Tennessee Department of Health. More than 20,000 tests have been conducted across the state, and adults ages 21-30 make up the largest age range with confirmed cases at 390. According to officials with Metro Nashville, Davidson County has 394 confirmed cases, with 80 of those individuals having recovered. Williamson County now has 101 cases, according to the TDH.

Updated 2:15 p.m. March 28

The number of cases of coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, has risen to 1,373, according to totals released March 28 by the Tennessee Department of Health. TDH totals show cases in Shelby County have surpassed the number in Davidson County with 269 cases.

According to the TDH, Davidson County has at least 243 cases, however that number varies from Metro Nashville's daily total of 376 total cases.

Updated 2:05 p.m. March 27

Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee have risen to 1,203, according to the latest numbers from the Tennessee Department of Health. Davidson County has more than 200, and Williamson County has 91.

As has been the case over the last few days, case estimates from Metro Nashville have been much higher than those released by the state. According to a press conference this morning with Metro Nashville Mayor John Copper, Davidson County has 312 cases confirmed.

Updated 2:08 p.m. March 26

Officials with the Tennessee Department of Health announced March 26 the number of cases of coronavirus in the state has risen to 957, up from 784 yesterday, an increase of 173 cases.

Updated 2:10 p.m. March 25

The number of coronavirus cases across the state has risen to at least 784, which is 117 more cases than yesterday, according to the latest update from the Tennessee Department of Health. Davidson County still has the highest number of cases at 188, up five from yesterday. While this may seem like a slow down in the number of new cases, Dr. Alex Jahangir, chair of the Metropolitan Board of Health and Metro Coronavirus Task Force, said in a press conference this morning he does not believe this means cases are slowing down.

Updated 4:02 March 24

In a press conference March 24, Lee called to schools to remain closed through April 24, an extension from his initial recommendation of April 3.

Updated 2:05 p.m. March 24

Cases of coronavirus are up to 667 statewide as of March 24, up 52 cases from yesterday, according to the Tennessee Department of Health. In Davidson County, at least 183 cases have been confirmed, according to TDH data. However, according to an announcement this morning from Metro Nashville, that number could be as high as 253. Because some facilities report cases based on where the sample was collected versus the person's county of residence, numbers can vary as it takes time to reconcile total cases, according to Bill Christian, associate director for the TDH office of communications and media relations. Williamson County has the third-highest number of cases in the state at 64 confirmed cases, which is 11 more than yesterday.

Updated 3:05 p.m. March 23

The number of cases of coronavirus is now 615, according to a March 23 update from the Tennessee Department of Health. This is 110 new cases since yesterday, March 22. According to an announcement from the TDH, new tracking processes have been recently implemented, which has led to lower figures in some counties.

Updated 2:10 p.m. March 22

Cases of coronavirus in the state have risen to 505, according to the latest update from the Tennessee Department of Health. This is 134 new cases since yesterday afternoon, according to the TDH.

Updated 2:01 p.m. March 21

Official with the Tennessee Department of Health announced March 21 the number of cases of coronavirus in the state has risen to 371, up by 143 cases since yesterday. The highest number of cases is still in Nashville, with 140 cases. Williamson County has the second highest number of cases at 47 and Shelby county has 40 cases.

Updated 7:55 p.m. March 20

Franklin and Brentwood officials have declared a state of emergency in each city following the spread of coronavirus in the region.

Franklin Mayor Ken Moore said Franklin's emergency declaration will go into effect March 20 at midnight in response to the coronavirus pandemic, following Gov. Bill Lee’s declaration of the state of Tennessee going into a state of emergency last week. The city of Brentwood's declaration will go into effect March 21 at 6 p.m.

Updated 2:10 p.m. March 20

At least 228 cases of coronavirus have been confirmed in Tennessee, according to the latest announcement from the Tennessee Department of Health. Just over 100 of those cases are in Davidson County, with Williamson County having the second-highest number at 35 cases. Cases have been confirmed in 26 counties across the state.

Updated 2:10 p.m. March 19

The total number of COVID-19 cases have risen to 154 in Tennessee, with 75 reported in Davidson County, 30 in Williamson County and the rest spread across numerous other counties in the state. The total number of cases increased by 56 from yesterday's report by the Tennessee Department of Health.

Updated 2:04 p.m. March 18

Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee have risen to 98 statewide, with more than half of all cases confirmed in Nashville, according to the Tennessee Department of Health. There are 58 confirmed cases in Davidson County and 24 cases in Williamson County. The total number of cases has risen from 39 cases on March 15. A small number of cases have now been confirmed in 13 counties across the state, including four in Shelby County and two each in Knox and Sumner counties.

Updated 5:13 p.m. March 17

GraceWorks Ministries will close March 18 and reopen the next day with modified services, including rent and utility assistance and drive-through food distribution.

Drive-through food distribution will take place at their community resource center at 104 Southeast Parkway, Franklin, Monday-Saturday from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. and Wednesday from 4-7 p.m.

Updated 3:33 p.m. March 17

Following a city order on March 15 to close all bars in Davidson County and have restaurants limit their seating capacities to 50%, several restaurants and shops in Williamson County have also reacted to the coronavirus by adjusting their business operations.

Updated 2:03 p.m. March 17

The number of cases of coronavirus in Tennessee has risen to 73 confirmed cases, according to officials with the Tennessee Department of Health. There are now 42 cases in Davidson County, up from 25 yesterday. Williamson County has the second highest number of cases at 21.

The age range with the highest number of cases is those from ages 18-49, according to the health department.

Updated 3:28 p.m. March 16

Franklin Mayor Ken Moore and City Administrator Eric Stuckey gave an update March 16 to residents on what the city is doing to respond to the coronavirus outbreak.

In addition to canceling or postponing events, including Arbor Day, Movie in the Park and the Kids Arts Festival, the city is also working to limit any meetings with more than 50 people. Stuckey said the city is looking into how to hold city meetings virtually. Most meetings are already live-streamed on the city's Facebook page and its website, Stuckey said.

While most city services are ongoing, and residents can pay bills online, Stuckey said the city's new Blue Bin recycling program has been suspended until further notice as the processor is unable to take items.

Updated 2:10 p.m. March 16

Officials with the Tennessee Department of Health announced March 16 the number of cases of coronavirus statewide has climbed to 52. More than 80% of these cases at in Davidson and Williamson counties, which have 25 and 18 confirmed cases, respectively.

Updated 12:07 March 16

Officials with Williamson County Schools and Franklin Special School District have announced campuses throughout the county will close through at least April 3.

Updated 11:36 March 16

With Williamson County Schools closed this week for spring break and Gov. Bill Lee urging schools to close until the end of March, local nonprofits are working to provide food for students and families throughout the county that previously relied on meals from the school system.

Social workers with WCS compiled a list of a few nonprofits in the county that are providing relief for families dealing with hunger and food shortages.

Updated 11 a.m. March 16

Gov. Bill Lee is urging all school districts in Tennessee to close "as soon as practically possible" to prevent the possible spread of coronavirus, or COVID-19, according to a statement released March 16. Lee said all schools should be closed by March 20 and remain closed through March 31.

“As the response to COVID-19 evolves, I urge every school district in Tennessee to close as soon as practically possible, with all schools expected to close by Friday, March 20, 2020 at the latest,” Lee said in a statement. “Schools should remain closed through March 31, 2020 to further mitigate the spread of this infectious disease and we will issue further guidance prior to March 31.”

Superintendents and local leadership will have the administration's support to determine dates for closure this week, according to Lee. Ahead of school closures, the Tennessee Department of Education set up a hotline for district leaders open on weekdays from 6:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at 629-888-5898.

State officials will issue additional guidance regarding future closures prior to March 31, according to Lee.

Updated 2 p.m. March 15

Confirmed coronavirus cases in the state of Tennessee have climbed to 39 statewide, according to the Tennessee Department of Health.

The total number of cases includes 17 in Davidson County and 14 in Williamson County as well as a small number of cases in seven additional counties across the state, according to TDH.

Metro Nashville Mayor John Cooper is encouraging social distancing as a measure to limit the spread of the virus.

“As my administration works with state and federal officials and community partners to respond to the coronavirus in Nashville and Davidson County, I encourage everyone to take necessary precautions to prevent person-to-person spread," Cooper said in a statement. "This includes postponing large public and private gatherings, encouraging teleconferencing and remote working, and taking all necessary precautions to protect employees, congregants, students, and all Nashvillians–especially our medically fragile residents."

Schools in the area will be closed this week for spring break, and multiple venues across the area, such as the Country Music Hall of Fame, Bridgestone Arena and more, are closed through at least the end of the month.

Updated 2:20 p.m. March 13

The number of confirmed and presumptive positive cases of coronavirus, or COVID-19, has increased to 26 cases statewide, according to a March 13 update from the Tennessee Department of Health.

According to the TDH, there are now 10 cases in Davidson County and nine cases in Williamson County. In addition to two cases in Shelby County, one case in Knox County and one case in Sullivan County—all of which had been previously reported by state health officials—the TDH now reports one case each in Hamilton, Jefferson and Rutherford counties.

Updated 2:30 p.m. March 12

Recorded cases of coronavirus, or COVID-19, doubled overnight from nine to 18, according to a March 12 2 p.m. update from the Tennessee Department of Health.

According to the TDH, there are now eight cases in Williamson County, six cases in Davidson County, one case in Knox County, one case in Sullivan County and two cases in Shelby County.

The update comes just hours after Gov. Bill Lee declared a state of emergency in Tennessee due to the increasing number of coronavirus cases.

Updated 11:32 a.m. March 12

Gov. Bill Lee declared a state of emergency for Tennessee at a press conference March 12 due to the spread of coronavirus, also known as COVID-19.

“We have watched over the past week how Tennesseeans have come together to address the tragedy amongst our neighbors as a result of the tornadoes,” Lee said. “Now, it’s time, once again, to come together around a different challenge: COVID-19 in Tennessee.”

At the time of the declaration, the statewide total of coronavirus cases was nine, according to the Tennessee Department of Health. Lee said he signed an executive order earlier in the day to request funds from the Federal Emergency Management Agency in order to combat the spread of the virus.

“This morning I signed Executive Order [No.] 14, which will move us into position to bring in additional funds from FEMA and relax certain laws which will make it easier to respond to this disease,” Lee said. “This emergency declaration is an important next step in our efforts to treat and mitigate the impact of this disease.”

Dr. Lisa Piercey, the commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Health, said the state lab had enough to supplies to test “at least 500 individuals” for the virus in addition to testing taking place in private labs. She said efforts are increasing across the state in order to “flatten the curve” and reduce the strain on healthcare facilities and resources by attempting to slow the growing number of cases.

“We’ve been ramping up our efforts for vulnerable populations, especially the elderly and those in nursing homes,” Piercey said. “Our hospitals have also made significant strides in the last several days on their testing and response efforts.”

Updated 3 p.m. March 11

The Tennessee Department of Health has confirmed two additional cases of coronavirus in the state, one in Davidson County and another in Williamson County, bringing the statewide total to nine as of 2 p.m. on March 11.

Overall, there are two cases in Davidson County and five cases in Williamson County, according to the TDH. The other two cases are in Shelby County and Sullivan County.

On March 10, the TDH announced it had updated its protocol for reporting cases of coronavirus to include each patient’s county of residence. The cases confirmed by the TDH include both confirmed and presumptive positive cases.

Updated 2:15 p.m. March 10

The Tennessee Department of Health has confirmed a seventh case of coronavirus in the state as of 2 p.m. on March 10. Additional details about the case have not yet been announced. According to previous announcements from the TDH, the majority of the cases confirmed to date have been in Middle Tennessee.

Updated 1:35 p.m. March 10

With more cases of Coronavirus being confirmed in Middle Tennessee, the Williamson Medical Center is taking steps to protect employees and patients from being exposed.

WMC Chief Medical Officer Andy Russell spoke during the Williamson County Board of Commissioners meeting March 9 to discuss how the hospital is preparing for a larger outbreak in the area.

Russell said beginning March 10, the hospital, located along Carothers Parkway in Franklin, is implementing a screening process for patients and others who enter the hospital.

Updated 11:25 a.m. March 10

The Tennessee Department of Health announced March 10 there are now two additional cases of coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, in the Middle Tennessee area, bringing the state’s total number of confirmed cases to six. The patients are both adult males, according to a news release.

The two new confirmed cases follow four other cases announced by the TDH, including one case in Williamson County, one case in Davidson County, one case in Shelby County and one other case identified only as being in the Middle Tennessee region.

Updated 8:31 March 10

Schools in Williamson County will remain closed through March 13 due to ongoing coronavirus concerns, according to district officials. Williamson County Schools plans to resume classes on March 23 following spring break.

Franklin Special School District will also be closed for the remainder of the week, according to an announcement on the district's website.

On March 10, WCS announced that a Brentwood area parent tested positive for coronavirus earlier this week. The district said it is still working with local health officials to determine the impact this may have on area schools.

Updated 11:36 a.m. March 9

The Tennessee Department of Health announced March 9 there is now one additional case of coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, in the Middle Tennessee area, bringing the state’s total number of confirmed cases to four.

Updated 10:20 a.m. March 6

Officials with the Tennessee Department of Health announced March 6 that the household contacts of Williamson County's first coronavirus patient have tested negative for the virus.

Updated 11:16 a.m. March 5

Officials with Williamson County Schools and Franklin Special School District announced March 5 it will close all campuses on Friday, March 6 and Monday, March 9 to deep clean schools following the confirmation of the state's first case of COVID-19, or coronavirus, in Williamson County.

"For the past several weeks, we have been working with the Williamson County Health Department and the Tennessee Department of Health as we all have been monitoring the rapidly changing coronavirus health issue in our country and across the world," WCS officials said in a social media post.

Original post 9:05 a.m. March 5

Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee announced March 5 that state health officials have identified the first confirmed case of COVID-19, also known as Coronavirus, in Williamson County.

“As of last night, we have our first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Tennessee,” Lee said. “As confirmed cases surface in other parts of the world, we in Tennessee prepared early. Tennessee was one of the first five states to begin COVID-19 testing and we continue to remain confident in our ability and in the measures that we’re taking to prevent the spread of this infection in our state.”

Tennessee Health Commissioner Dr. Lisa Piercey said the individual with the virus is an adult male living in Williamson County, who is currently being isolated at home while health officials work to determine if others who have come in contact with the patient have been exposed to the virus.

“The TDH state laboratory tested the individual yesterday and has submitted the results to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for confirmation,” Piercey said. “While we are saddened to learn this virus has now reached Tennessee, our recent preparedness efforts that the governor just mentioned have positioned us to respond swiftly and thoroughly.”
By Wendy Sturges
A Houston native and graduate of St. Edward's University in Austin, Wendy Sturges has worked as a community journalist covering local government, health care, business and development since 2011. She has worked with Community Impact since 2015 as a reporter and editor and moved to Tennessee in 2019.


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