GraceWorks Ministries in need of donations; will modify food, utility assistance programs due to coronavirus spread

GraceWorks Ministries will modify its food and utility assistance programs due to COVID-19. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
GraceWorks Ministries will modify its food and utility assistance programs due to COVID-19. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

GraceWorks Ministries will modify its food and utility assistance programs due to COVID-19. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

GraceWorks Ministries will close March 18 and reopen the next day with modified services, including rent and utility assistance and drive-through food distribution.


Drive-through food distribution will take place at their community resource center at 104 Southeast Parkway, Franklin, Monday-Saturday from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. and Wednesday from 4-7 p.m.

Families with school-aged children will be able to receive food every 15 days while schools are closed, and families without school-aged children will be able to receive food every 30 days.

Residents are encouraged to remain in their cars and follow directions while picking up food supplies from GraceWorks and must bring a photo I.D.

For those in need of financial assistance for utility and rent payments, Williamson County residents are asked to call 615-794-9055 Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. starting March 19 to see if they qualify.

The nonprofit also announced the closing of its thrift store, which is scheduled to reopen April 6, and the organization will not accept volunteers until it reopens.


Because the nonprofit will not have incoming revenue from the thrift store, it is in need of monetary donations, which can be made through its website.


“GraceWorks is trying to serve an extreme increase in demand for food and rent/utility assistance with an extreme decrease in manpower,” GraceWorks officials said in a release. “Please pray for the stamina and safety of our team.”


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