Canceled blood drives lead to blood shortage in Tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Health is encouraging healthy individuals to donate blood amid a state-wide blood shortage. (Courtesy Sanford Myers and American Red Cross)
The Tennessee Department of Health is encouraging healthy individuals to donate blood amid a state-wide blood shortage. (Courtesy Sanford Myers and American Red Cross)

The Tennessee Department of Health is encouraging healthy individuals to donate blood amid a state-wide blood shortage. (Courtesy Sanford Myers and American Red Cross)

The Tennessee Department of Health is encouraging healthy individuals to donate blood while blood drives are being canceled due to the spread of coronavirus in the area.


“Donors are needed to replenish the blood supply,” a TDH official said in a social media post. “If you are a healthy individual, you are encouraged to call your local blood center and ask if they can use your help by volunteering to donate blood.”

According to TDH, over 4,000 blood drives have been canceled due to the virus, equating to more than 130,000 fewer blood donations in the state.

For residents in Williamson County, blood donations are still being accepted by Blood Assurance, the sole blood supplier for the Williamson Medical Center. The nonprofit’s Williamson County center is located at 1412 Trotwood Ave., Ste. 69, Columbia. 931-548-8801. www.bloodassurance.org

The Franklin Lions Club will also hold a blood drive April 8 from 12-6 p.m., and is urging anyone who is sick, has immediate contact with someone who is sick or considers themselves a risk factor to not attend the drive.

According to the American Red Cross, there have been no reported cases of coronavirus being transmitted through blood, and the need for blood in medical facilities never stops.


"Every day, blood transfusions help revive patients who might not otherwise survive," Chief Medical Officer of the American Red Cross Pampee Young said in a release. "I have seen the relief in a loved one's eyes when told that a blood transfusion saved their child, parent or grandparent. Hosting a blood drive can make that relief happen."


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