Q&A: Stevan Pippin, Brentwood City Commission candidate

Election day in Montgomery County is May 4.

Election day in Montgomery County is May 4.

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Pippin
Stevan Pippin is one of nine candidates running for four available seats on the Brentwood City Commission. Community Impact Newspaper sent each candidate a list of questions. Answers below are edited for publication style.

This article is part of Brentwood municipal election coverage and does not constitute an endorsement of the candidate. Election day is May 7.

Experience: Brentwood Planning Commission since 2015, serving as Vice Chairman since 2016

Why did you decide to run for the City Commission?

I already serve as vice chairman of the Planning Commission going on 4 years now and want to continue my service to the city on a different board, with the goal of gaining a much deeper perspective and understanding of our great city and doing whatever I can to honor its past while focusing on its future.

In your opinion, what is the biggest issue facing Brentwood, and how do you plan to address it on the City Commission?

Like all cities within active growth zones like Middle Tennessee, we have our fair share of traffic concerns and by protecting the cornerstone of our community: low density residential zoning, we help prevent uncontrolled growth and urban sprawl, a symptom of which is traffic density. Some may not consider this to be the most critical issue we face, but I believe it is at least in the top three.

How will you balance density concerns with Brentwood's rapid growth?

Our history provides that answer for us, and it is similar to my answer in question No. 2. Our city founders saw the wisdom in preserving and protecting Brentwood's limited land resources as much as possible by creating thoughtful zoning that allows build-out at a sustainable, controlled rate, rather than the wide-open practices that some cities have in place.

Anything else you would like the community to know?

I serve this city not out of a love for politics or power, but out of a deep love for the city that I have called home for nearly 38 years.


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