Tin Cottage offers unique gifts, local lines

Owners Marianne and Greg DeMeyers began Tin Cottage in 1999 before moving to their location on Main Street in 2018.

Owners Marianne and Greg DeMeyers began Tin Cottage in 1999 before moving to their location on Main Street in 2018.

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Tin Cottage offers unique gifts, local lines
Image description
Tin Cottage offers unique gifts, local lines
Image description
Tin Cottage offers unique gifts, local lines
Image description
Tin Cottage offers unique gifts, local lines
Image description
Tin Cottage offers unique gifts, local lines
Taking inspiration from the neon “Happy” sign at the back of the store, owners Marianne and Greg DeMeyers have worked for 20 years to bring unique and cheerful items to Franklin.

Tin Cottage, named for its original location on Margin Street, moved into its existing space on Main Street in last April.

Marianne said the store stocks gifts and apparel, but it is centered around what customers will enjoy most, she said.

“Franklin was a lot different 20 years ago—there weren’t that many gift shops. And so we just kind of started out with offering several different things, tabletop and baby gifts. Over the course of a year or so, you just start developing sense for what your customer wanted,” she said. “People would walk in and say, ‘This place just makes me happy.’ We started trying to just hone in on what was it that was making people happy.”

Tin Cottage carries a variety of items, from home decor and candles to Franklin memorabilia.

“We try to do as much local as possible both for people in the community and to help sustain local art,” she said. [It’s] also for people that visit because they want to take home something that they couldn’t get at home or from their local gift shop or proprietor.”

While Tin Cottage has a number of regular customers who live in the area, it has also become a mainstay for people traveling and exploring downtown, the couple said.

“We do get a lot of people that are just traveling through and being able to just see that they can come in and have a good time in the store and walk out with a smile on their face,” Greg said. “I don’t know that I have ever been in a store where I felt compelled to go tell the people, ‘Hey, I love this place.’ It blows me away that we can do that.”

Marianne said she hopes visitors to the store can find something to make them laugh, even if they are just passing through.

“If you’re having a hectic day at work, or your kid didn’t want to wear their clothes that you picked out for them in school, and you’re just frustrated, we hope that the five minutes that [you] spend in here are just kind of a relief from that,” Marianne said.

Tin Cottage
334 Main St., Franklin
615-472-1183
www.tincottage.com
Hours: (spring) Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun. noon-5 p.m.
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By Wendy Sturges

A Houston native and graduate of St. Edward's University in Austin, Wendy Sturges has worked as a community journalist covering local government, health care, business and development since 2011. She has worked with Community Impact since 2015 as a reporter and editor and moved to Tennessee in 2019.


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