Gov. Bill Lee extends state of emergency to August 29, continuing alcohol to-go sales and Tennessee Pledge guidelines

Gov. Bill Lee signed Executive Order 50 June 29, extending the statewide state of emergency due to the spread of the coronavirus pandemic to Aug. 29 (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)
Gov. Bill Lee signed Executive Order 50 June 29, extending the statewide state of emergency due to the spread of the coronavirus pandemic to Aug. 29 (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

Gov. Bill Lee signed Executive Order 50 June 29, extending the statewide state of emergency due to the spread of the coronavirus pandemic to Aug. 29 (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

As case numbers continue to rise across the state, Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee has signed Executive Order No. 50, extending the statewide state of emergency due to the spread of the coronavirus pandemic to Aug. 29, according to a press release from the governor’s office.


The order will extend previous provisions that are in place to facilitate the containment and treatment of the coronavirus, including:


  • Urging Tennesseans to limit activity, stay inside when possible, follow department of health guidelines and maintain social distancing

  • Urging individuals to wear face masks while in close proximity to others

  • Urging employers to allow or require remote working if possible

  • Requiring that those infected with COVID-19 or display COVID-19 symptoms to stay home

  • Limiting gatherings of 50 or more unless social distancing measures can be maintained

  • Limiting contact sports

  • Limiting nursing home and long-term care facility visitation

  • Requiring employers to comply with the governor’s economic recovery group guidelines, also known as the Tennessee Pledge

  • Requiring bars to only serve customers who follow guidelines in the Tennessee Pledge

  • Continuing to allow take-out and delivery sales of alcohol

  • Providing easier access to unemployment benefits

  • Urging people and businesses to protect vulnerable populations

  • Extending deadlines and certain in-person continuing education or inspection requirements



The governor also signed Executive Orders 51, which allows local governments to meet electronically as long as the meetings are available to the public, and Executive Order 52, which allows for the remote notarization and witnessing of documents.


Find a full list of Lee's executive orders here.


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