Franklin Theatre announces new programming, executive director

Franklin Theatre announced a new vision, a new executive director and a new program series Feb. 26. (Courtesy Franklin Theatre)
Franklin Theatre announced a new vision, a new executive director and a new program series Feb. 26. (Courtesy Franklin Theatre)

Franklin Theatre announced a new vision, a new executive director and a new program series Feb. 26. (Courtesy Franklin Theatre)

Members of the Heritage Foundation of Williamson County and the Franklin Theatre announced a new vision and mission statement Feb. 26, along with an upcoming performing arts series and the naming of Paul Couch as executive director.



“The new vision of the Franklin Theatre is to be a catalyst for social change where diverse people are unified, lives are touched and memories are made,” Heritage Foundation CEO Barri Beasley said. “The mission of the Franklin Theatre is to provide world-class performing arts experiences to diverse Williamson County residents and visitors and to be a platform for local philanthropic engagement and education while also providing unparalleled guest services.”



David Garrett, president of the Heritage Foundations Board of Directors, announced that Paul Couch, who had served interim executive director since June 2019, will become the permanent executive director.



“We are so lucky to have Paul. He brings decades of experience with him to the Franklin Theatre,” Garrett said. “He has extensive experience in venue management as well as producing and presenting entertainment.”



The new programs presented by Couch include three different series to run from September 2020 to April 2021, including the “Great Performances Series,” the “Celebration of Dance Series” and the “Family Spotlight Series.” The different series will bring nationally and internationally recognized talent in a wide variety of performance types to the Franklin Theatre—from Black Violin, a hip-hop violinist, to award-winning Irish dancers Eireann.



“What we’re doing with the new performing arts season really represents a paradigm shift for the Theatre,” Couch said. “I don’t think anyone has thought of the Theatre in this way. ... The reason we’re doing this is so we can appeal to a broader range of Williamson County residents.”



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