1799 Kitchen and Cocktails in The Harpeth Hotel to open for Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving falls on Nov. 28. (Courtesy Fotolia)
Thanksgiving falls on Nov. 28. (Courtesy Fotolia)

Thanksgiving falls on Nov. 28. (Courtesy Fotolia)

Located in Franklin, 1799 Kitchen and Cocktails will open for Thanksgiving dinner service Nov. 28 inside The Harpeth Hotel, located at 130 Second Ave. N. The eatery will offer roasted turkey with chestnut stuffing and bourbon gravy as well as sides and dessert for $60 per person. The hotel—slated to open before the end of the year—is part of Harpeth Square, a mixed-use development under construction in downtown Franklin that will be home to multifamily units, retailers and restaurants. 615-206-7510. www.harpethhotel.com
By Wendy Sturges
A Houston native and graduate of St. Edward's University in Austin, Wendy Sturges has worked as a community journalist covering local government, health care, business and development since 2011. She has worked with Community Impact since 2015 as a reporter and editor and moved to Tennessee in 2019.


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