Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop to open Nashville location

The company opened a brick-and-mortar location in New York City, pictured above, in 2018.

The company opened a brick-and-mortar location in New York City, pictured above, in 2018.

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Goop, a lifestyle brand founded by Gwyneth Paltrow, is expected to open a brick-and-mortar store in 12 South at 2707 12th Ave. S., Nashville, according to a permit issued by Metro Nashville. The permit, which shows Brentwood-based company Shaub Construction in charge of the build out, was issued Monday, Aug. 12.

In addition to pop-up locations, Goop has permanent stores in New York, London and Los Angels, according to the company's website. The company sells beauty, fashion and kitchen products at its physical locations.

An opening date for the Nashville location has not been announced. www.goop.com
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