Pumpkins, grape stomps, festivals and more: 11 fall events in the Greater Nashville area

The 20th annual El Du00eda de los Muertos festival at Cheekwood Estate and Gardens brings together the traditions of Mexico and Latin America through art activities, dance, music and authentic cuisine.

The 20th annual El Du00eda de los Muertos festival at Cheekwood Estate and Gardens brings together the traditions of Mexico and Latin America through art activities, dance, music and authentic cuisine.

Fall is here in Music City and there are several fall festivals and things to do in your neighborhood and beyond.


Cheekwood Harvest


Sept. 21-Oct. 27
Cheekwood Harvest, a five-week event highlighting fall-related activities for children and adults is now underway. The seasonal event, which runs through Oct. 27, features a beer garden, more than 5,000 mums planted throughout the gardens, two pumpkin houses and more. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $13-$20. Cheekwood Estate and Gardens, 1200 Forrest Park Drive, Nashville. 615-356-8000. www.cheekwood.org





Nashville Film Festival


Oct. 3-12
The Nashville Film Festival celebrates its 50th anniversary with ten days of film premieres, informational sessions and red-carpet events. The festival, which is the only Academy Award-qualifying event in Tennessee, features more than 250 films with a greater focus on music-based films, films directed by women and independent feature films, according to event organizers. Showtimes vary. $15-$495. Regal Hollywood Stadium 27, 719 Thompson Lane, Nashville. 615-742-2500. www.nashvillefilmfestival.org






Worth the trip: Jack’s Pumpkin Glow


Oct. 3-27
This monthlong Halloween experience is located at Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage estate and features more than 5,000 jack o’ lanterns, a pumpkin patch, family-friendly activities and seasonal food and drinks. Hours vary by day. $16.99-$22.99. The Hermitage, 4580 Rachels Lane, Hermitage. www.glowpumpkin.com/nashville





Celebrate Nashville at Cultural Festival


Oct. 5
This annual festival encourages cross-cultural awareness through food, dancing, music, children’s activities and educational exhibits. The event draws more than 50,000 people annually, according to Metro Nashville Parks and Recreation. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Centennial Park, 2500 West End Ave., Nashville. 615-955-0881. www.celebratenashville.org





Grape Stomp


Oct. 5
A Vintage Affair hosts the ninth annual Grape Stomp, featuring 25 teams competing to collect the most grape juice in a stomping competition. The event will also include wine tasting, craft beer, signature cocktails and live music. Awards will also be given for best costumes. 4-8 p.m. $50. The Factory in Franklin, 230 Franklin Road, Franklin. 615-351-8165. www.avintageaffair.org





Go to City Winery’s Nashville Harvest Festival


Oct. 6 
City Winery’s second annual Nashville Harvest Festival features unlimited tastings of more than 50 wines, live music and food vendors. Attendees can also tour the on-site urban winery, according to event organizers. noon-6 p.m. $35-$50. City Winery, 609 Lafayette St., Nashville. 615-324-1010. www.citywinery.com





Worth the trip: Nashville Oktoberfest


Oct. 10-13
The 40th annual Nashville Oktoberfest is a four-day festival celebrating traditional German food, beer and music. The event also features a parade through Germantown, a bratwurst-eating contest, a 5K race and more family-friendly activities. 2-10 p.m. (Thu.), 10 a.m.-10 p.m. (Fri. and Sat.), 10 a.m-8 p.m. (Sun.). Free (admission). 998 5th Ave. N., Nashville. 615-686-2867. www.thenashvilleoktoberfest.com





Franklin Wine Festival


Oct. 25
The 15th annual festival returns to The Factory in Franklin with more than 300 wines to sample as well as food from local eateries, such as Puckett’s Gro. & Restaurant, Bishop’s Meat & 3, and Deacon’s New South. Proceeds from the event will benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee. 7-10 p.m. $35-$145. 230 Franklin Road, Franklin. www.franklinwinefestival.com





Pumpkinfest


Oct. 26
The Heritage Foundation of Williamson County hosts this 36th annual fall event in downtown Franklin, featuring vendors, live music, games, food and, of course, plenty of pumpkins. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Free (admission). Downtown Franklin. 615-591-8500. www.williamsonheritage.org





El Día de los Muertos at Cheekwood Estate and Gardens


Nov. 2
The 20th annual El Día de los Muertos festival at Cheekwood Estate and Gardens brings together the traditions of Mexico and Latin America through art activities, dance, music and authentic cuisine. El Día de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is a holiday traditionally observed in Mexico to celebrate and honor ancestors. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Free (17 and under), $18-22 (adults). Cheekwood Estate and Gardens, 1200 Forrest Park Drive, Nashville. 615-356-8000. www.cheekwood.org





Family Day


Nov. 2
The city of Franklin hosts this fall festival, with a petting zoo, face painting, hay rides, food trucks, crafts, pony rides, miniature train rides and more. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free (admission). The Park at Harlinsdale Farm, 239 Franklin Road, Franklin. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov


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