Four Central Austin transportation updates to know in August and September




1. Capitol Complex Master Plan construction


Work has begun on a project that will close A. West 18th Street between Brazos and Congress Avenue for the duration of the construction, expected to last through 2022.  The project will add office space for state agencies and transform the area surrounding the Capitol Complex into a civic space. Phase 1 of the Capitol Complex Master Plan will create two new office buildings, one at  B. 1601 Congress Ave. and one at C. 1801 Congress Ave., in addition to five levels of underground parking.

Timeline: 2018-2022
Cost: $581 million (Phase 1)
Funding source: Texas Facilities Commission






2. I-35 at Oltorf Street improvements


Short-term lane and frontage road closures occurred through July and August during a project to improve I-35 and Oltorf Street. After reconstructing the Oltorf Street bridge in the fall, crews have been working in the area to make improvements to the I-35 frontage road and construct southbound I-35 entrance and exit ramps south of Oltorf. The project is expected to be completed in the spring.

Timeline: Feb. 2017-spring 2019
Cost: $42.6 million
Funding source: Texas Department of Transportation






3. Guadalupe Street corridor design


The city of Austin has begun fieldwork on Guadalupe Street between 18th Street and 29th Street, as well as some adjacent street segments. The work is intended to gather additional information in order to design improvements and will result in some intermittent daily lane closures. Guadalupe is one of nine corridors currently in the design phase as part of a corridor construction program.

Timeline: Design phase could last 12 to 36 months. Construction could begin in 2019.
Cost: $19.8 million
Funding source: 2016 mobility bond





4. San Antonio Street reconstruction


Workers will perform pavement restoration on San Antonio Street from Cesar Chavez Street to Third Street. In addition, they will install two van accessible parking spaces at the intersection of Fourth Street and Nueces Street and two spaces at Fourth and San Jacinto Boulevard. This is the fourth phase in a series of projects to improve mobility in the area around Third Street.

Timeline: August-September 2018
Cost: $304,000
Funding source: city of Austin Economic Development and Public Works




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