City of Alpharetta approves construction plan contracts to add lanes to Old Milton Parkway

Construction cones
Alpharetta City Council approved contracts at the July 20 meeting to continue progress on the widening of Old Milton Parkway between North Point Parkway and Kimball Bridge Road. (Courtesy Fotolia)

Alpharetta City Council approved contracts at the July 20 meeting to continue progress on the widening of Old Milton Parkway between North Point Parkway and Kimball Bridge Road. (Courtesy Fotolia)

Alpharetta City Council members approved contracts at the July 20 meeting—totaling $2.8 million—for the development of final construction plans and management of the city's project to widen Old Milton Parkway. This project will widen the parkway from four to six lanes between North Point Parkway and Kimball Bridge Road.

Planning and design is being paid for by local funds, including the voter-approved Transportation Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax in 2016. Due to this investment, the Georgia Department of Transportation agreed to fund construction of the additional lanes using a combination of state and federal dollars, according to a news release July 23. Old Milton Parkway is part of the state highway system and is designated as State Route 120.

"Because GDOT is involved and federal money is being used, the project has to follow the federal plan development process," Alpharetta Public Works Director Pete Sewczwicz said. "That means we have to follow a prescribed process and timeline for completing roadway, bridge, hydro and urban design; traffic analysis and design; environmental surveys and studies; topographical and property surveys; environmental site assessments; and geotechnical analysis and design. This adds a good bit of time to the normal schedule to complete the project, but the amount of money GDOT is bringing to the table makes it worth the extra steps."

These federal requirements mean it will take approximately three to five years to complete the design and right of way acquisition process. Firm cost estimates will not be available until after construction plans are complete, but rough estimates based on the conceptual design total $30 million, of which the city will fund $5 million.

The city will also be responsible for negotiating and funding the acquisition of all right of way and easements necessary to complete the project, which has an estimated price tag of an additional $1.5 million.


"If not for GDOT's investment and participation, due to the total cost, we would not be able to take on this project," Sewczwicz said.
By Kara McIntyre
Kara started with Community Impact Newspaper as the summer intern for the south Houston office in June 2018 after graduating with a bachelor's degree in mass communication from Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas. She became the reporter for north Houston's Tomball/Magnolia edition in September 2018, moving to Alpharetta in January 2020 after a promotion to be the editor of the Alpharetta/Milton edition, which is Community Impact's first market in Georgia.


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