City of Alpharetta kicks off 2040 Comprehensive Plan process with public survey

Alpharetta City Hall building
Alpharetta Director of Community Development Kathi Cook presented the kickoff to the city's 2040 Comprehensive Plan process during the public hearing portion of the July 20 Alpharetta City Council meeting. (Kara McIntyre/Community Impact Newspaper)

Alpharetta Director of Community Development Kathi Cook presented the kickoff to the city's 2040 Comprehensive Plan process during the public hearing portion of the July 20 Alpharetta City Council meeting. (Kara McIntyre/Community Impact Newspaper)

Alpharetta city officials and staff kicked off the city's 2040 Comprehensive Plan process at the July 20 Alpharetta City Council meeting, starting with a public input survey that residents can fill out. The comprehensive plan is a long-range planning tool cities use to guide future development, according to city documents, and it must be adopted by June 30, 2021.

The survey opened July 20 and closes Aug. 10, and it can be found here. Areas of focus for the 2040 Comprehensive Plan include community goals/vision, land use, housing, economic development, transportation, community improvement elements, a five-year community work program and broadband services—which is a new focus area added to the minimum comprehensive plan requirements from the state in the last year, Alpharetta Senior Planner Michael Woodman said during the meeting.


The planning process will rely on both in-person and online public engagement from city residents, elected officials, property owners and other stakeholders over the next year.

Public meetings on the 2040 Comprehensive Plan are tentatively scheduled for September 2020 and January 2021, as well as a public hearing on the draft plan in May 2021.

"We're just kicking off this campaign, making sure that the public's aware of what's going on," Mayor Jim Gilvin said during the meeting.
By Kara McIntyre
Kara started with Community Impact Newspaper as the summer intern for the south Houston office in June 2018 after graduating with a bachelor's degree in mass communication from Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas. She became the reporter for north Houston's Tomball/Magnolia edition in September 2018, moving to Alpharetta in January 2020 after a promotion to be the editor of the Alpharetta/Milton edition, which is Community Impact's first market in Georgia.


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