Alpharetta City Council approves contract for inclusive community playground at Alpharetta Elementary School

An inclusive playground is coming to Alpharetta Elementary School for both school use and city resident use, per an intergovernmental agreement between the city of Alpharetta and Fulton County Schools. Here is a look at the proposed playground. (Rendering courtesy city of Alpharetta)
An inclusive playground is coming to Alpharetta Elementary School for both school and city resident use, per an intergovernmental agreement between the city of Alpharetta and Fulton County Schools. Here is a look at the proposed playground. (Rendering courtesy city of Alpharetta)

An inclusive playground is coming to Alpharetta Elementary School for both school and city resident use, per an intergovernmental agreement between the city of Alpharetta and Fulton County Schools. Here is a look at the proposed playground. (Rendering courtesy city of Alpharetta)

Alpharetta City Council members and Mayor Jim Gilvin approved a contract between the city and Playsouth Playground Creators for a new inclusive community playground, located at Alpharetta Elementary School, at the May 4 council meeting.

The city initially approved an intergovernmental agreement for this project between the city and Fulton County Schools on March 2—meaning in exchange for the new playground and landscape improvements to the site, the playground area can serve as a city park during non-school hours, Community Impact Newspaper previously reported.


The new playground—which will cost $107,992 with $75,000 funded by Northside Hospital Foundation and the Resurgens Charitable Foundation—will feature inclusive equipment to accommodate disabled students and residents, Community Impact Newspaper previously reported.

The approved contract will allow construction to begin and playground equipment to be ordered and installed before the start of the 2020-21 school year, which will begin in August, said Morgan Rodgers, the city's director of recreation, parks and cultural services.

"This is really a great deal for us," Council Member Jason Binder said during the meeting. "At my core belief of why I'm here is [that] I believe that we need to have parks within a 10-minute walk from everybody [in the city of Alpharetta], from every neighborhood. By doing partnerships like this, it gets us to add a park to the public at very low cost."
By Kara McIntyre
Kara started with Community Impact Newspaper as the summer intern for the south Houston office in June 2018 after graduating with a bachelor's degree in mass communication from Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas. She became the reporter for north Houston's Tomball/Magnolia edition in September 2018, moving to Alpharetta in January 2020 after a promotion to be the editor of the Alpharetta/Milton edition, which is Community Impact's first market in Georgia.