Alpharetta City Council, mayor close all public parks; trails, paths, Big Creek Greenway remain open

To further push coronavirus prevention efforts, the city of Alpharetta closed all parks and park facilities at the March 23 City Council meeting. Trails, paths and the Big Creek Greenway are still open.
To further push coronavirus prevention efforts, the city of Alpharetta closed all parks and park facilities at the March 23 City Council meeting. Trails, paths and the Big Creek Greenway are still open. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

To further push coronavirus prevention efforts, the city of Alpharetta closed all parks and park facilities at the March 23 City Council meeting. Trails, paths and the Big Creek Greenway are still open. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Continuing with coronavirus response efforts, Alpharetta Mayor Jim Gilvin and City Council members closed all city parks, park facilities, fields, pavilions, buildings, the Town Green, playgrounds and restrooms for the next 30 days via an emergency ordinance passed at the City Council meeting March 23. This means all active spaces—such as ball fields, basketball courts and tennis courts—are closed, and any parking lots for parks that have those amenities will also be closed, Assistant City Administrator James Drinkard said.

The ordinance can be repealed or extended by vote of the mayor and City Council members.


In the meantime, residents can still use the trails, paths and the Big Creek Greenway; however, as stated in the ordinance, individuals using these amenities are "prohibited from gathering in groups of 10 or more persons" or "failing to exercise social distancing of at least six feet from all other persons who do not reside in the same dwelling unit."

Alpharetta Code Enforcement officers and Alpharetta Department of Public Safety officers will be enforcing the measures of the ordinance. City staff will begin placing barricades at the entrances to the parking areas at most city parks to aid in enacting the ordinance, according to a March 24 press release from the city.
By Kara McIntyre
Kara started with Community Impact Newspaper as the summer intern for the south Houston office in June 2018 after graduating with a bachelor's degree in mass communication from Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas. She became the reporter for north Houston's Tomball/Magnolia edition in September 2018, moving to Alpharetta in January 2020 after a promotion to be the editor of the Alpharetta/Milton edition, which is Community Impact's first market in Georgia.